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Part 1: Chuck D Education and Voting Lecture

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Chuck D is politically active; he co-hosted Unfiltered on Air America Radio, testified before Congress in support of peer-to-peer MP3 sharing, and was involved in a 2004 rap political convention. He continues to be an activist, publisher, lecturer, and producer. Addressing the negative views associated with rap music, he co-wrote the essay book Fight the Power: Rap, Race, and Reality, along with Yusuf Jah (ISBN 0-385-31868-5). He argues that “music and art and culture is escapism, and escapism sometimes is healthy for people to get away from reality”, but sometimes the distinction is blurred and that’s when “things could lead a young mind in a direction.”[15] He also founded the record company Slam Jamz and acted as narrator in Kareem Adouard’s short film Bling: Consequences and Repercussions, which examines the role of conflict diamonds in bling fashion.

In an interview with Le Monde published 29 January 2008,[16] Chuck D stated that rap is devolving so much into a commercial enterprise, that the relationship between the rapper and the record label is that of slave to a master. He believes that nothing has changed for African-Americans since the debut of Public Enemy and, although he thinks that an Obama-Clinton alliance is great, he does not feel that the establishment will allow anything of substance to be accomplished. He also stated that French President Sarkozy is like any other European elite: he has profited through the murder, rape, and pillaging of those less fortunate and he refuses to allow equal opportunity for those men and women from Africa. In this article, he also defended a comment made by Professor Griff in the past that he says was taken out of context by the media. The real statement was a critique of the Israeli government and its treatment of the Palestinian people. Chuck D stated that it is Public Enemy’s belief that all human beings are equal.

In an interview with the magazine N’Digo published in late June 2008, he spoke of today’s mainstream urban music seemingly relishing in the addictive euphoria of materialism and sexism, perhaps being the primary cause of many people harboring resentment towards the genre and its future. However he has expressed hope for its resurrection, saying “It’s only going to be dead if it doesn’t talk about the messages of life as much as the messages of death and non-movement”, citing artists such as NYOil, M.I.A. and the The Roots as socially conscious artists who push the envelope creatively. “A lot of cats are out there doing it, on the Web and all over. They’re just not placing their career in the hands of some major corporation.”[17]

Most recently Chuck D became involved in Let Freedom Sing: The Music of the Civil Rights, a 3-CD box set from Time Life. He wrote the introduction to the liner notes and is visiting colleges across the nation discussing the significance of the set. He’s also set to appear in a follow up movie called Let Freedom Sing: The Music That Inspired the Civil Rights Movement.

In 2010 Chuck D released a track entitled “Tear Down That Wall.” He says, “I talked about the wall not only just dividing the U.S. and Mexico but the states of California, New Mexico and Texas. But Arizona, it’s like, come on. Now they’re going to enforce a law that talks about basically racial profiling.”[18]

He is on the board of the TransAfrica Forum a Pan African organization that works for the right of Africa, Caribbean and Latin American issues.[1

 

-Wikipedia

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